Becoming a Successful Freelance Manager

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Research has been done and it has been clear that the most successful leaders and managers are those who are in close relationships with their junior workers and followers.

Spending time with your employees and getting to know them at their personal level serves to build a long-lasting trust between you and them. Knowing your employees by name is also equally effective as this gives them an assurance that they are being valued. They in turn reciprocate this by giving in their best to your business and what follows is a magnificent move, which that could result in a new revolution for your business or company

Life entails wisdom, intelligence and swiftness. Deal with situations wisely and be fast enough to handle issues before they get out of hands. Mysson

Letting people know that, with their jobs put aside, they still remain to be people of dignity and personality, would serve to treasure you, not only as their boss but as a real human being who is not only interested in the progress of his or her company but also at the welfare and the living standards of their employees.

This trust would result in immense performance of the business and attract demand and investment.

As a leader or a manager in a given company or an organization, spend time to inspire your employees. Tell them how precious they really are and that the business greatly depends on them.

The biggest mistake we’ve made is to blindly assume that employees depend on the job and the job provider. The two depend on one another hence; one cannot do without the other. Tell them that the company cannot afford to lose even one of them. Inspire them at their personal level. Advise them on how to spend their salaries.

Remind them that they need to be with their families hence they should find time over the weekend to pay them a visit. Make them understand that finding time for their families would serve to make the relationships stronger. Encourage them to move on with their dreams. Do not be mean. Share. If you can’t share anything, share knowledge and experience. Encouragement is the medicine for heart-brokenness and serves to bring the best in people.

Public criticism destroys one’s self-esteem and confidence. Be careful when scolding your employees less you collapse your business!

Appreciation is another thing for the progress of any business or an organization. Awards cannot be overlooked as this serves as greatest motivation and brings the best in people. Spending a million in motivation is much more productive than the hundreds of millions companies spend in advertisement. Tell your employees, “work well done.” This goes a mile and a half to take your business up the ladder of progress.

Towards the end of every year or month if possible, take your employees out for a retreat or consider sharing a portion of your profits with them. This is an effective way of boosting the morale of your employees. People with psyche are more likely to deliver fast and high quality service. Remember also to always be just and fair while giving promotions.

Highly committed workers should be considered first. Note also that holding people for too long without any promotion would lower their morale as well.

It is also an indefeasible duty of any business enterprise to develop its workers first. Development of the company starts with the development of the workers. Show me a successful business and I will show you successful workers.

It is therefore important that you provide your employees with opportunities through which they can go for training and advance their studies.

The following 3-Ps chain can show success of companies:

People→ Profit→ Progress.

Few weeks ago, I learnt another lesson from a story I read from the internet.

Once upon a time, two brothers who lived on adjoining farms fell into conflict. It was the first serious rift in 40 years of farming side by side, sharing machinery, and trading labour and goods as needed without a hitch.

Then the long collaboration fell apart. It began with a small misunderstanding and it grew into a major difference, and finally it exploded into an exchange of bitter words followed by weeks of silence.

One morning there was a knock on John’s door. He opened it to find a man with a carpenter’s toolbox. “I’m looking for a few days work,” he said.

“Perhaps you would have a few small jobs here and there. Could I help you?” “Yes,” said the older brother. “I do have a job for you. Look across the creek at that farm. That’s my neighbor. In fact, it’s my younger brother. Last week there was a meadow between us and he took his bulldozer to the river levee and now there is a creek between us. Well, he may have done this to spite me, but I’ll go him one better. See that pile of lumber curing by the barn? I want you to build me a fence – an 8-foot fence – so I won’t need to see his place anymore. Cool him down anyhow.”

The carpenter said, “I think I understand the situation. Show me the nails and the post hole digger and I’ll be able to do a job that pleases you.” The older brother had to go to town for supplies, so he helped the carpenter get the materials ready and then he was off for the day.

The carpenter worked hard all that day measuring, sawing, and nailing. About sunset when the farmer returned, the carpenter had just finished his job. The farmer’s eyes opened wide, his jaw dropped. There was no fence there at all. It was a bridge – a bridge stretching from one side of the creek to the other! A fine piece of work – handrails and all – and the neighbour, his younger brother, was coming across, his hand outstretched. “You are quite a fellow to build this bridge after all I’ve said and done.”

The two brothers stood at each end of the bridge, and then they met in the middle, taking each other’s hand.

They turned to see the carpenter hoist his toolbox on his shoulder. “No, wait! Stay a few days. I’ve a lot of other projects for you,” said the older brother. “I’d love to stay on,” the carpenter said, ” but I have many more bridges to build.”

Every day we have the choice of building fences or bridges. One leads to isolation and the other to openness.

Source of the story :  Roger Darlington

Decision remain ours, whether to widen the gap of hatred by setting up fences or bring about reconciliation by building bridges

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Victor is a content strategist and specializes in SEO, Email marketing, long form and data-driven contents. He loves seeing people win and helps small online businesses to create contents that convert. He is the founder and content strategist here at The Penny Matters. You can read all his posts by visiting his author page

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